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CNRI in the News

LOST SOMETHING ON THE INTERNET? NEVER AGAIN WITH NEW DIGITAL OBJECT (DO) ARCHITECTURE

ITU Blog posting, January 6, 2014. ITU talked to Robert E. Kahn about his work on DO Architecture and his motivation for bringing it to ITU.

 

A new Recommendation on "Framework for discovery of identity management information".

"Framework for discovery of identity management information" [available free of charge at http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-X.1255-201309-I; ITU announcement: http://newslog.itu.int/archives/137] was approved at an International Telecommunication Union (ITU) meeting in Geneva (ITU-T Study Group 17 (Security)) on September 4, 2013. The work is based largely on CNRI's Digital Object Architecture; and Robert E. Kahn, CNRI's President, served as Editor. While the Recommendation is focused specifically on identity management information, it is applicable more generally to many different types of information in digital form.

 

Dr. Robert E. Kahn received the first Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering at a ceremony at Buckingham Palace.

Announced March 18, 2013, Dr. Kahn was awarded the QE Prize for his "contributions to the development of the fundamental architecture for the Internet and the World Wide Web".

 

Announcing Version 7.0 of the HANDLE.NET Software.

CNRI is pleased to announce the release of Version 7.0 of the HANDLE.NET software, a significant upgrade to the Handle System. The major improvements include the addition of template handles, offline signatures, a multiple location type, DNS interface, Jython interpreter, and the use of Berkeley DB as the default storage system.

 

An international coalition announced the launch of an Entertainment Identifier Registry (EIDR) that uses CNRI's Handle System and DO Registry technologies.

A coalition led by MovieLabs, CableLabs® and Rovi Corporation announced the launch of a non-profit, global, independent registry for cataloging movies, television shows, and other commercial audio/video assets. See the October 27, 2010, Press Release.

 

Dr. Robert E. Kahn receives the ITU World Telecommunication and Information Society Award 2010.

The ITU World Telecommunication and Information Society Award is given to "distinguished laureates for their contribution towards building an inclusive and more equitable Information Society". In 2010, the award was given to "eminent personalities who have contributed to ... providing a better life in cities". The global ceremony commemorating the World Telecommunication and Information Society Day 2010 was held on 17 May during the World Expo 2010 in Shanghai, China.

 

Dr. Robert E. Kahn receives the 2010 Harold Pender Award.

The faculty of the University of Pennsylvania, School of Engineering and Applied Science gives the award annually "to outstanding members of the engineering profession who have achieved distinction by significant contributions to society". The award was presented following a lecture entitled, "The Internet: Lessons from the Past and Implications for the Future" by Dr. Kahn and joint award recipient Dr. Vinton G. Cerf.

 

Press Release. CNRI Releases its Digital Object Repository, December 30, 2009.

"Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI) is pleased to announce the release of its Digital Object Repository ("DO Repository") for the management of digital objects on the Internet. This release comes with an open source license and includes an open, flexible, secure and scalable protocol and software suite that provides a common interface for interacting directly with all types of digital objects through an interface that is based on the use of identifiers and can be applied to existing repository or storage systems."

 

Interview with Bob Kahn. "A different kind of Internet" by Wyatt Kash, Government Computer News (GCN), May 14, 2009.

"Internet pioneer still envisions an Internet that manages information, instead of just moving data."

 

Video of Interview with Robert Kahn. ITU World Telecommunication Policy Forum, Lisbon, Portugal, April 23, 2009.

From the YouTube description: "Interview with Dr Robert Kahn ... during the ITU's World Telecommunication Policy Forum. WTPF is a high-level international event to exchange views on the key policy issues arising from todays fast changing information and communication technology (ICT) environment."

 

Science. "Education and Training Technology in the Military", J. D. Fletcher, 2 January 2009.

From the article: "Efforts to increase both the portability and reusability of learning objects and capabilities for on-demand instruction ... have cumulated in the DOD Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) initiative ... In cooperation with the Corporation for National Research Initiatives, the ADL initiative also developed the Content Object Resolution, Discovery, Registry/Repository Architecture (CORDRA)." [doi:10.1126/science.1167778]

 

How the Web Was Won: An Oral History of the Internet, Vanity Fair Magazine.

"Fifty years ago, in response to the surprise Soviet launch of Sputnik, the U.S. military set up the Advanced Research Projects Agency ... Each breakthrough -- network protocols, hypertext, the World Wide Web, the browser -- inspired another as narrow-tied engineers, long-haired hackers, and other visionaries built the foundations for a world-changing technology. Keenan Mayo and Peter Newcomb let the people who made it happen tell the story." Bob Kahn interview, July 2008.

 

CNRI CEO Bob Kahn Awarded the 2008 Japan Prize.

The Science and Technology Foundation of Japan awarded Dr. Robert E. Kahn the Japan Prize for 2008 in the "Information Communication Theory and Technology" category.

 

Computer History Museum. "An Evening with Robert Kahn in conversation with Ed Feigenbaum".

From the Computer History Museum Presents Speaker Series, January 9, 2007. The full video is available from the museum.

 

Seattle Post-Intelligencer. "E-mail from the grave? Microsoft seeks patent on 'immortal computing'", by Todd Bishop, seattlepi.com, January 22, 2007.

Comments from Bob Kahn on the subject of ensuring long term access to digital informational resources.

 

Laurea Honoris Causa a Vinton G. Cerf e a R. E. Kahn, l'Università di Pisa, May 2006.

The University of Pisa conferred the Bachelor Specialistica Honoris Causa in Computer Science Engineering to Vinton G. Cerf and Robert E. Kahn during a ceremony held 26 May 2006. (See the abstract of Dr. Kahn's lecture.)

 

Second Phase of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), 16 November 2005, Tunis.

Statement by Dr. Robert E. Kahn, for Corporation for National Research Initiatives.

 

CNRI CEO Bob Kahn Receives Presidential Medal of Freedom.

In a White House ceremony on November 9, 2005, Bob Kahn received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, America's highest civil award, for his pioneering work on the development of the Internet."

 

National Public Radio. Computer Pioneers Discuss the State of the Net, NPR Morning Edition, 22 August 2005.

"Vint Cerf and Robert Kahn, pioneers in the development of the Internet, recently won the Turing Award, considered the Nobel Prize of computing ... present their assessment of the Internet and its future."

 

Q & A. Interview with Robert Kahn, 14 August 2005, C-SPAN series airing Sunday nights at 8PM and 11 pm ET.

"Robert Kahn discusses his involvement in the creation of the internet, its future and usage worldwide today."

 

ACM 2004 Alan M. Turing Award Winners Vinton G. Cerf and Robert E. Kahn. ACM Announcement, 16 February 2005.

Citation: "For pioneering work on internetworking, including the design and implementation of the Internet's basic communications protocols, TCP/IP, and for inspired leadership in networking."

Related articles:

"Internet Pioneers Cerf and Kahn to Receive ACM Turing Award: Team Developed Architecture for Computers to Communicate". ACM Press Release, New York, February 16, 2005

"Laurels for Giving the Internet Its Language" by Katie Hafner, The New York Times, 16 February 2005.

 

Financial Times | FT.com. "Getting a handle on data", by Julian Perkin Financial Times, 17 November 2004. (The Financial Times at FT.com is available by subscription only.)

See also the second article of this two-part feature: "Avoiding identity crises", also by Julian Perkin, Financial Times, 1 December 2004.

"Handle-based identifiers, including DOIs, are unique on a global basis, and persistent -- that is, they will stand the course of time, unlike many web addresses. As a result, they are guaranteed to resolve to a real document and can be used, through a system of access via trusted intermediaries, to ensure that everyone gets the same, definitive version of a document such as a government report."

 

Release 1.0. "Online Registries: The DNS and Beyond...", by Esther Dyson in Release 1.0, Esther Dyson's Monthly Report, September 2003. [ doi:10.1340/309registries ]

"Meanwhile, the Handle System and its "digital object architecture," developed by Bob Kahn (who also has much of the Internet's architecture to his credit), offers both better technology and "lessons-learned" governance ... but unfortunately it lacks the visibility of the DNS, which is an order of magnitude larger in the number of things registered (approaching 200 million vs. less than one tenth of that). In this issue we start with a look at ICANN and the Domain Name System, and use it as a lens through which to assess the promise and challenges of other registries."

 

Ubiquity. "Putting it all together with Robert Kahn", in Ubiquity, an ACM IT Magazine and Forum, Vol. 4, Issue 3, March 11-17, 2003.

"'The co-founder of the Internet recalls the non-commercial early days and looks at today's issues of fair use, privacy and the need for security."

 

The Washington Post. "Visions Of a Wild and Wireless Future", by Shannon Henry, The Download, 23 May 2002, E01. Copy available for purchase from the Washington Post archive.

"'There are a lot of people who think the Internet happened in the '90s,' says Kahn. Actually, its history is far more extensive. By the same token, present-day AOL does not begin to define the almost boundless future of the medium. All great inventions take years to be explored and appreciated, he says. The age of this technology has only just begun."

 

Washingtonian. "Geeks Rule; Vinton Cerf and Robert Kahn, Internet Fathers", by John Adam, December 2001, pgs. 42-43.

"Nearly 30 years ago, Bob Kahn left his MIT faculty post, took a job at the Defense Department, and moved to Georgetown. Soon after, Kahn convinced Stanford University professor and software expert Vint Cerf to join him at the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The intriguing goal: to enable computer networks to talk to each other."

 

Computerworld. "Reinventing the Internet", interview with Bob Kahn by Gary H. Anthes, August 27, 2001.

"Who is he? Internet pioneer Robert E. Kahn is chairman, CEO and President of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives, a nonprofit organization established to 'provide leadership and funding for research and development of the National Information Infrastructure.'"

 

Business Week. "A Library to End All Libraries", Stephen H. Wildstrom, July 23, 2001.

...The project is also part of a much broader effort to make Web content easier to locate and retrieve. ... The underlying technology, called the Handle System, was designed by the government-funded Corporation for National Research Initiatives. CNRI President Robert E. Kahn, one of the original designers of the Internet, describes the mission as "reconceptualizing the Net from the movement of data packets to the management of information."

 

 
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